Hawaii emergency officials say ballistic missile threat alert was a mistake

Hawaii crisis officials confirmed Saturday that an notify warning that a ballistic missile had been inbound to the island was a error.

Earlier Saturday, Hawaiian citizens documented receiving an emergency alert on their mobile phone that stated: “ BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. LOOK FOR IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A EXERCISE. ”

House Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, tweeted in regard to the alert: “ HAWAII – THIS IS A FALSE SECURITY ALARM. THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE TO THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. I HAVE CONFIRMED WITH OFFICIALS THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO INCOMING MISSILE. ”  

The hawaiian islands Emergency Management Agency tweeted there was “ NO missile threat” to the state.  

The hawaiian islands Emergency Management agency spokesman Rich Repoza said the alert was obviously a false alarm. He said the particular agency was working to determine what occurred.

The particular alert created panic for inhabitants on the island and across social networking.  

Fox News’ Chad Pergram said he spoke in order to two people on the Kona side from the island who said they were informed to stay in their hotel room and that there was clearly a missile incoming.  

Cdr. Dork Benham, a spokesman for Oughout. S. Pacific Command, told Sibel News they have “detected no ballistic missile threat to Hawaii. Previously message was sent in error. Condition of Hawaii will send out the correction message as soon as possible. ”

Sen. John Schatz, D-Hawaii, tweeted “ it had been a false alarm based on individual error. There is nothing more important to The hawaiian islands than professionalizing and fool-proofing this technique. ”

Schatz had written in a separate tweet that so what happened was “totally inexcusable. ” 

“The whole state was afraid. There needs to be tough and fast accountability and a fixed process, inch the senator wrote.  

The second notify sent by Hawaii’ s Crisis Management Agency telling citizens there is no threat arrived approximately 37 minutes after the ballistic warning risk.

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, messaged that she would work to find out exactly what occurred.

“ Today’ t alert was a false alarm, ” Hirono wrote. “ At a time associated with heightened tensions, we need to make sure information released to the community is precise. We need to get to the bottom of so what happened and make sure it never occurs again. ”

A Whitened House official said President Trump, who is spending the weekend within Florida, has been briefed on the event, which they said “was purely a situation exercise. ”

Hawaii Gov. David Ige said in a statement that “While I am thankful this morning’ h alert was a false alarm, the general public must have confidence in our emergency notify system. I am working to get to underneath of this so we can prevent a mistake of this type in the future. ”

The declaration noted Ige is meeting with best officials from the State Department associated with Defense and the Hawaii Emergency Administration Agency “to determine what caused this particular morning’s false alarm and to avoid it from happening again. inch

Fox News’ Jennifer Bowman, Shelter Ross, Lucas Tomlinson and Chad Pergram and The Associated Press led to this report.  

Nicole Darrah covers breaking plus trending news for FoxNews. possuindo. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah .